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Introducing Expert JavaScript

almost 4 years ago | Mark Daggett: Mark Daggett's Blog

As many of you know I have spent much of the last six months writing a book on JavaScript. I am pleased to announce that last week APress began shipping it out to stores and distribution centers everywhere. In my mind, good technical books are part mixtape, treasure map, and field journal. "Expert JavaScript" is the result of my efforts to successfully weave these forms together into a compelling and information-rich book about JavaScript. A mixtape, for those old enough to remember, is a curated collection of songs. These tapes were often made as gifts for friends, lovers, and those in between. The mixer would craft the tape by selecting personal favorites or organizing tracks along a conceptual thread. Often these tapes were a surrogate for the mixer, a way to be remembered by the listener when the tape was playing. This book is a mixtape for JavaScript that I made for you. These chapters cover some of my favorite aspects of the language, but also includes less-understood topics because they are not easily explained in a tweet or blog post. The long form format of a book affords these subjects the necessary room to breathe. As a child, I found the idea of finding a treasure map a thrilling prospect. I was captivated by the idea that anyone could become rich as long as they followed the map. This book will not lead you to buried treasure, but it is a map of sorts. I laid out these chapters to chart the inner workings of the language, which you can follow to the end. Dig through these concepts with me and you will unearth a deeper understanding of JavaScript than when you started. A field journal is kept by scientists. They are taught to keep a log of their thoughts, observations, and hunches about their subject. They may even tape leaves, petals, or other artifacts of nature between its pages. It’s a highly contextual diary about a subject of study filtered through a specific point of view. The purpose of the field journal is to be a wealth of information that the scientist can continually mine when they are no longer in the field. "Expert JavaScript" is my field journal of JavaScript, which I wrote to return to often. I will use it to help me remember and understand the particulars of the language. I encourage you to do the same. Scribble in the margins, highlight sections, and bookmark pages. It is not a precious object; it is meant to be a living document that is improved through your use. Table Of Contents (with comments) Chapter 1: Objects and Prototyping (What JavaScript is and isn’t) Chapter 2: Functions (Deep dive into functions including changes in es6) Chapter 3: Getting Closure (Understanding the dark arts of closures) Chapter 4: Jargon and Slang (lexical border guards to the community) Chapter 5: Living Asynchronously (promises, coroutines, webworkers) Chapter 6: JavaScript IRL (nodebots, JohnnyFive, node-serialport, firmata ) Chapter 7: Style (understanding programmatic style) Chapter 8: Workflow (sensible workflow for JavaScript developers) Chapter 9: Code Quality (how to evaluate and improve quality in code) Chapter 10: Improving Testability (what really makes code "untestable," hint it’s not the code)

IdeaChat – Innovation in product design

almost 4 years ago | James Torio: Designing the experience

I had a conversation on spreecast on how to generate ideas for products and how to quickly test your ideas. Innovation in product design

A great read for JavaScript newcomers

almost 4 years ago | Dave Kerr: dwmkerr.com

A superb article by Colin Eberhardt has just been published on the CodeProject, called 'Understanding JavaScript Object Creation Patterns'. This article should be on the reading list of anyone who's new to JavaScript or not familiar with how objects and prototypes work. It takes you step by step through the

Introducing Practical AngularJS

almost 4 years ago | Dave Kerr: dwmkerr.com

I was recently at Devoxx in Antwerp, primarily because I wanted to get involved in some of the sessions that were being hosted by guys from the AngularJS team at Google. I've had a chance to work a little with Backbone and KnockoutJS and had been recently deliberately holding off

Unit Testing Backbone.js

almost 4 years ago | Rocky Jaiswal: Still Learning

Hello from cold Berlin! After a couple of vagabond weeks it's good to back in my favorite city, hopefully for a long long time. Back to technology and more specifically JavaScript. I have been talking a lot about organizing / writing better client side code and this discussion would not be ...

Space Invaders on the CodeProject

almost 4 years ago | Dave Kerr: dwmkerr.com

I'm currently writing a series of articles on the CodeProject called 'Learn JavaScript' and am pleased to say that the latest article is available now! Learn JavaScript Part 2 - Space Invaders In this article we take a look at how to create the classic space invaders game with plain

Unable to launch the IIS Express Web server

almost 4 years ago | Sumit Bajaj: Sumit Bajaj's Blogs

I had exactly the same issue. Tried everything but finally one trick worked.Delete folder IISExpress from "My Documents"Load your project again, it will create IISExpress folder again with updated configurationCheck IISExpress folder has sufficient permissions to read-write the configuration fileLoad project again and Run IISExpress. It should work.Author: Sumit Bajaj

Yeoman, Angular and D3 – A solid stack for web apps

almost 4 years ago | Oscar Villirreal: Digital Caveman

Slides from my workshop given at JSChannel in Bangalore India

Angular from Scratch: Slides from AngularJS Meetup DC

almost 4 years ago | Christian Lilley: UI Guy

Thanks to all who attended! Thanks to Leigh Frampton for organizing and to LearningObjects (and Optoro :-)) for hosting. Demo files available to clone here. Angular from Scratch from Christian Lilley

Angular from Scratch: Slides from AngularJS Meetup DC

almost 4 years ago | Christian Lilley: UI Guy

Thanks to all who attended! Thanks to Leigh Frampton for organizing and to LearningObjects (and Optoro :-)) for hosting. Demo files available to clone here. Angular from Scratch from Christian Lilley

How to setup Yeoman in Windows from scratch

almost 4 years ago | Suman Paul: My Blog

If you are using Mac or any *nix system you are right at home, but for windows it’s little bit of work. Follow the steps below to get up and running with yeoman in windows system. First Install Ruby dependencies     Install Ruby for Windows from http://rubyinstaller.org/     Open Command prompt     Check ruby version […]

Difference between == and === ?

almost 4 years ago | Suman Paul: My Blog

One of favorite interview question on JavaScript which I normally get started with. And it turns out the answer I knew, and in fact invariable everyone who gave the answer,  were wrong. So the answer I expected is == check the value and === check both value and type Well it turns out although from […]

Teradata: exception info for program name: disstart

almost 4 years ago | Chris Parker: Quick bits from Chris

If you are getting this: Internal error: Please do not resubmit the last request.  SubCode, CrashCode: and this: signal: 11 SIGSEGV code:   1 SEGV_MAPERR addr:   0000000000000002 registers: rip 0000000000000014  eflags 3d247208 rsp 000000000000b000  rbp 00002aaaaed7bd60 rax 00002aaac06e8000  rbx … Continue reading →

Teradata: exception info for program name: disstart

almost 4 years ago | Chris Parker: Quick bits from Chris

If you are getting this: Internal error: Please do not resubmit the last request.  SubCode, CrashCode: and this: signal: 11 SIGSEGV code:   1 SEGV_MAPERR addr:   0000000000000002 registers: rip 0000000000000014  eflags 3d247208 rsp 000000000000b000  rbp 00002aaaaed7bd60 rax 00002aaac06e8000  rbx … Continue reading →

Expanded Ruby Under a Microscope Available in Print!

almost 4 years ago | Pat Shaughnessy: Pat Shaughnessy

Order your copy today at NoStarch.com. Use coupon code LENS to get a 40% discount! I’m happy to announce Ruby Under a Microscope

Migrating to Angular 1.2: Modular Routing, Animations, ng-If, et al.

almost 4 years ago | Christian Lilley: UI Guy

Note that Angular 1.2 is not yet officially released. They’re currently at Release Candidate 3, which you can install via direct download of the ‘unstable’ release at Angularjs.org, or with: bower install angular#1.2.0-rc.3 There’s no official migration guide available as yet. So, I’m assembling bits and pieces from my own experience and from posts by […]

Migrating to Angular 1.2: Modular Routing, Animations, ng-If, et al.

almost 4 years ago | Christian Lilley: UI Guy

Note that Angular 1.2 is not yet officially released. They’re currently at Release Candidate 3, which you can install via direct download of the ‘unstable’ release at Angularjs.org, or with: bower install angular#1.2.0-rc.3 There’s no official migration guide available as yet. So, I’m assembling bits and pieces from my own experience and from posts by […]

Angular’s ng-Show vs ng-Switch (and ng-If!): Important Differences

almost 4 years ago | Christian Lilley: UI Guy

There’s a critical and undocumented (AFAIK) distinction between several of Angular’s directives. On the surface, ng-show/ng-hide, ng-switch and the new ng-if all produce exactly the same results: partials/DOM-fragments that appear and disappear. I used to think that ng-Show and ng-Switch were just different syntax for the same thing: convenience variations, essentially. And then, ng-If came […]

Angular’s ng-Show vs ng-Switch (and ng-If!): Important Differences

almost 4 years ago | Christian Lilley: UI Guy

There’s a critical and undocumented (AFAIK) distinction between several of Angular’s directives. On the surface, ng-show/ng-hide, ng-switch and the new ng-if all produce exactly the same results: partials/DOM-fragments that appear and disappear. I used to think that ng-Show and ng-Switch were just different syntax for the same thing: convenience variations, essentially. And then, ng-If came […]

Working with Angular.js and Rails - 2

almost 4 years ago | Rocky Jaiswal: Still Learning

In my last blog I covered setting up a basic Rails + Angular.js webapp with Rails-API and Yeoman. As promised in this post we will look at building a si ...

Free APIs

almost 4 years ago | Eduard Moldovan: eduardmoldovan.com - tech

All of us have used APIs and probably a few free ones too. Here are some you might not know yet.

Clojure for the Brave and True to be Published, Remains Free Online

almost 4 years ago | Daniel Higginbotham: Flying Machine Studios

Good news everybody: I've signed a deal with No Starch Press to publish Clojure for the Brave and True! Not only that, the entire book will continue to be available for free online! Please sign up for notifications on new chapter releases: My hope is that this will provide as many people as possible with a thorough, entertaining introduction to Clojure. By being published through an established, respected company, it's possible for Clojure for the Brave and True to reach aspiring Clojurists through channels which I don't have the time or means to cultivate. By keeping the book online for free, I get to stay true to my hippie aspirations of free learning for everyone. What's more, the book will now be professionally edited — a big win for Clojure noobies and, I think, for the Clojure community. This is super cool! I can't think of any other publisher that allows an author to continue publishing a book for free online as he writes. I'm really excited by the book deal and am looking forward to collaborating with No Starch. They really "get" that writing the book is a creative, artistic endeavor for me. Also, writing Clojure is fun, I want my book to be fun, and No Starch really understands fun. Fun! Those who bought the book on Leanpub, have no fear: you will continue to receive updated PDF's and will receive the final, No Starch PDF at no additional cost. Thanks for buying the beta book! If you haven't already, please have a look at Clojure for the Brave and True. If you have already — thank you! I've really appreciated all the feedback and encouragement I've gotten so far, and I'm very happy to be able to contribute back to the community. By the way, there's a new chapter up: Writing Macros. Also, I'm going to be at the Conj in a couple weeks and would love to chat with folks about learning Clojure or anything else Clojure. Hope to see you there!

Google+ Finally Permits Cross-posts from WordPress!

almost 4 years ago | Christian Lilley: UI Guy

I wrote previously about what a pain it is to get your WordPress blog posts over into G+, like you can easily do for Twitter,  Facebook, and LinkedIn. Really, it was only semi-feasible, and didn’t work automatically. Problem solved. You can now add Google+ to your ‘Publicize’ options in the WordPress Dashboard, at least on […]

Google+ Finally Permits Cross-posts from WordPress!

almost 4 years ago | Christian Lilley: UI Guy

I wrote previously about what a pain it is to get your WordPress blog posts over into G+, like you can easily do for Twitter,  Facebook, and LinkedIn. Really, it was only semi-feasible, and didn’t work automatically. Problem solved. You can now add Google+ to your ‘Publicize’ options in the WordPress Dashboard, at least on […]

Converting a Hybrid Mobile Project to XCode 5 & iOS7

almost 4 years ago | Christian Lilley: UI Guy

I had just a momentary lapse of reason the other day: after weeks of holding off on upgrading my iPad to iOS 7, I abruptly felt that I had been left behind. So, after double-checking that all our key enterprise features were supported, I made the leap. And then I went back to work. On […]

Converting a Hybrid Mobile Project to XCode 5 & iOS7

almost 4 years ago | Christian Lilley: UI Guy

I had just a momentary lapse of reason the other day: after weeks of holding off on upgrading my iPad to iOS 7, I abruptly felt that I had been left behind. So, after double-checking that all our key enterprise features were supported, I made the leap. And then I went back to work. On […]